Cinerama Collection 1952-1966 1080p Blu-ray AVC DTS-HD MA 5.1

This Is Cinerama (1952)

Director: Array
Stars: L

Runtime: 115 minutes (taken from iMDB)
Genre: Documentary

Rating: 7.1* (may differ)
Votes: 328 (may differ)

Release Date: 1955-01-05 (taken from IMDb)
Viewer Rating (TV/MPAA): G (taken from IMDb)

Summary: A standard screen B&W prologue during which Lowell Thomas shows how, from the dawn of history, mankind has attempted to create the illusion of depth & movement by artistic, mechanical and photographic means. Cinerama format opens with Rockaway Playland Roller Coaster, then Temple Dance from “Aida”, views of Niagra Falls, Long Island Choir – an early test of CineramaSound in B&W -, Canals of Venice, Edinburgh Military Tattoo, bullfight and musical performance in Spain, Act II finale of “AIDA” at La Scala Opera House, Milan. “Intermission 15 minutes” Act II commences with a sound demonstration – “we call it stereophonic sound” says LT. Then to Cypress Gardens, Florida, for trick water skiing and boating scenes. The last half of Act II- “America the Beautiful”- is viewed from the nose of a low flying B-25 aeroplane. Finally, credits.

Links: iMDBNFO

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5 Responses

  1. geekzapoppin says:

    Oh, how I wish that the only other Cinerama feature would be restored. The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm isn’t a classic, by any means, but it’s got some great sequences in it. Alas, it is being left to rot.

  2. Bananaman says:

    Checked this to see if the The Golden Head was here to complete my Cinerma collection, and it’s here! Thanks!

  3. Parkerbcn says:

    Thanks a lot for this compilation, dorukhan. For what I can see the only missing is Flying Clipper-Mediterranean Holiday in UHD, but it’s available separate on the website.

  4. dorukhan says:

    What is Cinerama? (for those who might not already know):

    Cinerama was an innovative panoramic and widescreen process that originally projected images simultaneously from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply curved screen of 146° of arc to approximate the complete range of view of a human being. This technology preceded, and is credited by some, to have encouraged today’s widescreen and IMAX technologies. It was the first of a number of novel processes introduced during the 1950s when the movie industry was reacting to competition from television. The original system involved shooting with three synchronized cameras sharing a single shutter.

    To better understand the introduction of the Cinerama technology, its days of glory, and the reasons for its ultimate decline, please watch the documentary Cinerama Adventure. It is available only as a extra on the two disc set of How the West Was Won. If you are totally new to Cinerama, I recommend watching this documentary before watching any of the films. It will impress upon you how innovative this technology was back in 1952 and why it was ultimately eclipsed.

    There were a limited number of titles produced in the Cinerama format during the period 1952 to approximately 1966.

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